Lifestyle activities in mid-life contribute to cognitive reserve in late-life

Cam-Can; Henson, Richard; Valenzuela, Michael; Spink, Molly; Matthews, Fiona; Shafto, Meredith; Chan, Dennis; Kievit, Rogier:Lifestyle activities in mid-life contribute to cognitive reserve in late-life, independent of education, occupation and late-life activities

Neurobiology of Aging, Volume 70, October 2018, Pages 180-183

Abstract

Introduction: This study tested the hypothesis that mid-life intellectual, physical and social activities contribute to cognitive reserve (CR). Methods: 205 individuals (196 with MRI) aged 66-88 from the Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (www.cam-can.com) were studied, with cognitive ability and structural brain health measured as fluid IQ and total grey matter volume, respectively. Mid-life activities were measured using the Lifetime of Experiences Questionnaire. Results: Multivariable linear regression found that mid-life activities (MA) made a unique contribution to late-life cognitive ability independent of education, occupation and late-life activities. Crucially, MA moderated the relationship between late-life cognitive ability and brain structure, with the cognitive ability of people with higher MA less dependent on their brain structure, consistent with the concept of CR. Conclusions: Mid-life intellectual, physical and social activities contribute uniquely to CR. The modifiability of these activities has implications for public health initiatives aimed at dementia prevention.

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Published Mar. 7, 2019 4:15 PM - Last modified Aug. 26, 2019 2:55 PM